Tag Archives: Neurosurgeon

A good day to live (aka the clean MRI Scan)

Did it take so long last time? I have had a few, but did it last for “at least half an hour”? Maybe my attention was directed on going into the tunnel previously. I have had MRI Scans at 3 different hospitals now. At Stellenbosch when I was admitted following my first seizure in May 2012, then Somerset-West due to the super-duper scanner to aid diagnosis, another prior to my operation and finally at Panorama to mark out the mask I was due to wear during radiotherapy. Now it came full circle. I am back at  radiology in Stellenbosch to re-scan, 7 months after my craniotomy and the surgery to remove my unwanted Oligodendroglioma. I know, it sounds like a tumour with a degree and a shotgun.

Dressed in a purple frock I lay under the bright hospital lights. An aweful pop songs plays out in the background. The scanner table supporting me feels narrow, the blanket over me soothing. But it does not calm my fear. I grip the tube leading to the small rubber balloon that resembles the pumpy bit of a sphygmomanometer (that measures blood pressure). However in this setting “Pumpy” is my weapon against claustrophobia. You did not know? Yes, I am scared of small spaces – have always been. And while I am at it, I might as well admit my fear of heights. This dates back to before my sense of invincibility was shattered in 2012. Before I was struck out of the blue with the scan images that showed the tumour in my left frontal lobe.

MRI ScannerShe is friendly, reassuring but professional. Her words of support are balanced by skipping through the instructions and a final question about anxiety. “Occasionally”, I lied, feeling the slight dampness in my hand holding the panic button. “We are just behind the glass”. Her smile was more reassuring than her words. I breathe and close my eyes. I will not repeat my previous mistake. Don’t keep your eyes open while sliding into the scanner. Not again! Even though the flat table is mounted low when you get on, it raises up before moving electronically into the tunnel. The closeness to the “roof” triggered my anxieties before and it was only moments between the closing of my chest, my heart kicking against my ribs and my fingers closing in on the panic button for escape. So I close my eyes and feel movement into the open mouth of the machine.

Apart from the “button”, I rely on breathing to calm me down and my imagination to drift into creative ventures. My mind’s eye luckily opens up colours at first, then ideas and memories. I feel my body resting heavier on the surface beneath me, while I am surrounded my noises that sound like a broken drum machine.

Without warning I was moving out. The light on my eyelids told me I was out in the open. Through my ear-plugs I could hear a mumbling voice. These are good to keep the thumping and humming noises at bay during scanning, but do not benefit communication. Furthermore is difficult to make the words out as my head is kept steady with two rests on both sides. Oh yes, time for the injection of “contrast material” that enables a sharper contrast on the scan. Again I close my eyes after the cool sensation in my arm replaces the sharp sting. Breath. Think colours. Drift away to a foreign place out of tunnel-land. Relax.

I carry the CD containing images of my brain in my bag for the next 24 hours. Unopened it stayed. Strangely it did not concern me much. Anneén and I spoke before going to bed about the upcoming appointment with Martin (my neurosurgeon) and both felt at peace. We go over the facts. I have not had further seizures since the first ones; my language skills appear to be intact, no significant praxis problems and my executive functions (i.e. multi-tasking, planning, taking initiative) is as bad as it has always been! And through writing my blog and steadily increasing my running distance I feel a sense of achievement and connection with the world around me. Maybe it was our talk, maybe the awareness that I had no control over the messages encrypted on the CD, but I slept like a baby prior to the day of the big reveal.

Martin is younger than us, but he carries calmness in his eyes and words. I don’t doubt his knowledge or expertise. The fact that he has been inside my head twice before does forge a strange connection. He does not rush when he opens the scan images, both from yesterday’s scan and the ones from before surgery. “It looks very good” he says, “There is a little scaring from the operation and the radiotherapy, but no sign of tumour”. We look closely at the computer screen as he indicates a ventricle that has returned to normal seize and to where the brain has pushed towards the front where the tumour was removed “to fill up the empty space”. I ask what I need to do from here on. Should I scrutinize my diet? Should I watch my alcohol intake? Do I continue to take Epilim? Martin reassures, “Continue with the medication and complete the chemotherapy, but live your life as if you are cured” After all we have been through, this fantastic news seep in slowly. It is gone, no tumour left.

I often look at brain scans with my psychiatrist colleagues at work.
However it is different knowing the one looking back is your own.

I wish I can paint a smile on it.

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Filed under My Brain Tumour and I, This thing called life